The lands of Kingcausie were acquired from the Knights of St, John of Jerusalem in 1535 by Henry, third son of Alexander Irvine of Drum. He married Jean, the eldest daughter of the first Collison of Auchlunies.

 

 

In 1592 the proprietor was John Irvine, who was keeper of the whole salmon fishings belonging to the town of Aberdeen between Kincardine O'Neil and Aberdeen.^ The office had been attended with considerable risk, for it became necessary to take caution from certain parties, " that they would not harm the said John Irvine." In his capacity of keeper of the salmon fishings, Irvine, in September, 1604, became cautioner for Alexander Irvine of Drum for Five hundred merks that he " would not slay any salmon in forbidden time." Irvine had at least three sons, Alexander, Andrew, and John. A daughter, Mary, married Thomas Johnston of Caskieben.'^ In 1596 he acquired from Alexander Jaffray, burgess of Aberdeen, the lands of Sheddocksleys in the parish of Newhills, and, in the following year, he and Alexander and John, his sons, as "tutors of John Irving" his grandson, granted them to Thomas Forbes, younger, burgess of Aberdeen.

On 17th March, 1630, Alexander Irvine wasadmitted a Burgess of Aberdeen. On the samedate he was served heir to his father in half a net's salmon fishing on the water of Don. At this time the struggles between the Covenanters and Royalists were so incessant and severe that Irvine, having visited Montrose, in company with the young laird of Drum, rendered himself obnoxious to the Estates, who offered a reward of Five thousand merks for his apprehension. It is related by Spalding that upon the night of Saturday the 17th August, 1644, Irvine, while on his way to Aberdeen, was met by William Forbes, natural son ofJohn Forbes of Leslie, who happened to be coming out of that town towards Banchory-Devenick, where his father then resided. The meeting took place about the "Crabstane." Forbes, anxious to gain the reward, attempted to make Irvine a prisoner, but the latter " being ane fyne gentilman stormit to be tane with the lyk of him" ; whereupon Forbes drew a pistol and shot Irvine dead before he could defend himself Instead of being brought to trial and executed for this cruel murder, Forbes was esteemed as having done good service ; but just retribution, as was then considered, fell upon him in the following year, inasmuch as when firing a musket he had his right hand shot away. On 20th September, 17 15, James Irvine, the laird of the period, joined the Earl Marischal and his party at the proclamation of the Pretender as King, at the Cross of Aberdeen. On that occasion the health of the banished Prince was drunk with great enthusiasm ; at night the bells were rung and the town illuminated, while a lawless mob broke the windows of the supporters of the House of Hanover. By the death of her brother and grandfather the property passed to Ann Irvine, who, in 1783, married Claude Boswell of Balmuto in Fife, advocate, afterwards Lord Balmuto, by whom she had one son and two daughters. The son, John Irvine Boswell, succeeded, and his history is told Aberdeen, was met by William Forbes, natural son ofJohn Forbes of Leslie, who happened to be coming out of that town towards Banchory-Devenick, where his father then resided. The meeting took place about the "Crabstane." Forbes, anxious to gain the reward, attempted to make Irvine a prisoner, but the latter " being ane fyne gentilman stormit to be tane with the lyk of him" ; whereupon Forbes drew a pistol and shot Irvine dead before he could defend himself Instead of being brought to trial and executed for this cruel murder, Forbes was esteemed as having done good service ; but just retribution, as was then considered, fell upon him in the following year, inasmuch as when firing a musket he had his right hand shot away. On 20th September, 17 15, James Irvine, the laird of the period, joined the Earl Marischal and his party at the proclamation of the Pretender as King, at the Cross of Aberdeen. On that occasion the health of the banished Prince was drunk with great enthusiasm ; at night the bells were rung and the town illuminated, while a lawless mob broke the windows of the supporters of the House of Hanover. By the death of her brother and grandfather the property passed to Ann Irvine, who, in 1783, married Claude Boswell of Balmuto in Fife, advocate, afterwards Lord Balmuto, by whom she had one son and two daughters. The son, John Irvine Boswell, succeeded, and his history is told two—the Balmuto property going to the son, and the Kingcausie portion to the daughter, who is married to Archer Irvine Fortescue of Swanbister, in Orkney.

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